All posts by georgemcgowan

Monsters for Free: Anchor Hocking Universal Monsters Drinking Glasses

The Coolest Gas Station Giveaways of the 1960s

Anchor Hawking Universal Monster Glasses Set

Anchor Hocking Universal Monsters Drinking Glasses             Set of 4 – 1963

The mid-1960s was the peak of the Monster Craze in the U.S. and classic monsters were everywhere; on Saturday afternoon television, in toy and hobby stores, on the magazine rack and even at the gas station.  Gas stations in the 60’s would give out a glass with a free tank of gas just as fast food chains did in the 80’s and the subject matter would reflect the popular trends at the time.

Anchor-Hocking, a glassware company, produced a set of four glasses for gas stations featuring the Universal Monsters in 1963. The glasses featured colorful images of Frankenstein’s Monster, the Wolf Man, the Mummy and the Creature from the Black Lagoon but surprisingly no Dracula. The release date of the set falls before the lawsuit that virtually removed Dracula from merchandising due to the Bela Lugosi likeness so it unusual to see the Creature included.
The day-glow vibrant colors, great facsimiles of the classic monsters (which wasn’t always a sure thing during this time period) and the popularity of the four characters featured on the glasses are all reasons for the demand and popularity of this collectible set.  Glasses were painted and have a nice textured feel to them.

The following pictures are the glasses set in my collection:

Frankenstein Monster Drinking Glass

Anchor Hawking Frankenstein Glass

I love the Glenn Strange likeness of the Monster on this glass, but it appears they started at the top with this illustration and ran out of room to include the traditionally heavy platform boots.  His too-small feet really throw the overall design off for me despite the great face illustration.

The Wolf Man Drinking Glass

Anchor Hawking Wolf Man Glass

Wonderful art of Lon Chaney Jr’s iconic character.

The Mummy Drinking Glass

Anchor Hawking Mummy Glass

It’s not often that my favorite piece is a set is The Mummy, but it is my favorite in this case. The Lon Chaney Jr likeness is the best of any classic monster collectible (outside of a Famous Monsters cover) and the vibrant colors just really do it for me!

Creature from the Black Lagoon  Drinking Glass

Anchor Hawking Creature Black Lagoon Glass

My favorite of the Universal Monsters, and a really cool glass.

These glasses aren’t hard to find in good condition but they have gotten quite expensive in recent years.  Considering that these pieces are over 50 years old, the relatively good condition of many of these glasses is a testament to how well made they are.  Anchor Hocking is still in operation to this day and it’s no surprise if these glasses are representative of their product quality.

Based on a quick search of eBay, prices for individual glasses are ranging from $75 to $125 regardless of which character.  Finding complete sets is still possible, though this might be one to put on the estate and garage sale wish list at current secondary market prices!

Collecting Dracula: 1931 Movie Posters

The Film that Launched the Universal Monsters

Dracula 1931 Lobby Card

Film posters were designed to have short life spans.  They were simply intended to promote upcoming and new releases while a film was in the theater.  When the film left the theater, the posters were thrown away.  Since scarcity and desirability are primary drivers of value, film posters of classic movies are now extremely valuable – particularly for a film as iconic as Universal’s Dracula starring Bela Lugosi. 

The iconic nature of Todd Browning’s Dracula and the enduring legacy of Bela Lugosi’s performance make posters for this film some of the most coveted – and expensive – of all classic film posters.  Unfortunately, only a few posters are known to exist today from the wide range of designs that originally existed.

Below, we’ve included artwork from the original 1931 Universal press book to give you a look at the original designs that are not known to exist any longer.

One Sheet Film Posters

Dracula 1931 One Sheet Style A
Dracula 1931 One Sheet Style A
Dracula 1931 One Sheet Poster Style F
Dracula 1931 One Sheet Poster Style F

We previously published  in-depth article on the Style F One Sheet in our Classic Movie Posters series.  You can read it here:

Classic Movie Posters – Dracula 1931 One Sheet

The following One Sheet Styles are from the original 1931 Film Press Book but no known examples of these posters exist (if they do…Wow! What a find it will be!)

Dracula-1931-one-sheet-style-b
Dracula 1931 One Sheet Style B
Dracula 1931 One Sheet Style C
Dracula 1931 One Sheet Style C

Dracula 1931 Three Sheet:

Dracula 1931 Three Sheet Style D
Dracula 1931 Three Sheet Style D
Dracula 1931 Three Sheet Style E
Dracula 1931 Three Sheet Style E

Dracula 1931 Six Sheet:

Dracula 1931 Six Sheet
Dracula 1931 Six Sheet

Dracula 1931 24 Sheet

Dracula 1931 24 Sheet
Dracula 1931 24 Sheet

Dracula 1931 Insert

Dracula 1931 Insert
Dracula 1931 Insert

Dracula 1931 Half Sheets:

Dracula 1931 Half Sheet Style A
Dracula 1931 Half Sheet Style A
Dracula 1931 Half Sheet Style B
Dracula 1931 Half Sheet Style B

Dracula 1931 Window Cards:

Dracula 1931 Window Card Style A
Dracula 1931 Window Card Style A
Dracula 1931 Window Card Style B
Dracula 1931 Window Card Style B

Dracula 1931 Herald:

Dracula 1931 Herald Front
Dracula 1931 Herald Front
Dracula 1931 Herald Back
Dracula 1931 Herald Back
Dracula 1931 Herald Interior
Dracula 1931 Herald Interior

Dracula 1931 Jumbo Lobby Cards:

Dracula 1931 Lobby Card

Dracula 1931 Lobby Card

Dracula 1931 Lobby Card

Dracula 1931 Lobby Card

Dracula 1931 Lobby Card

Dracula 1931 Lobby Card

Dracula 1931 Lobby Card

Many of these incredible pieces of ephemera are, unfortunately, lost to history.  And all of them are beyond he reach of most collectors.  Regardless, we have the film and, through this digital gallery, we can all relish the awesome pop culture art of these iconic posters.

Related:

Take a Virtual Tour of Guillermo del Toro AT HOME WITH MONSTERS Exhibit

Opening Night of Guillermo del Toro’s                    AT HOME WITH MONSTERS Exhibit

Guillermo del Toro Bleak House

Collecting Classic Monsters HQ is located in the heartland of the U.S. And while that means not having the abundance of film memorabilia events that our friends in say Los Angeles or New York, we seem to make up for that in quality.  This weekend, I had the great pleasure of attending one such quality event, the opening night gala of Guillermo del Toro‘s exhibit At Home With Monsters at the Minneapolis Institute of Art.

 “The exhibition reveals the creative process behind del Toro’s singular vision by bringing together elements from his films, objects from his vast personal collections, and drawings from his notebooks, alongside objects del Toro has selected from Mia’s permanent collection.”

While this quote from the MIA press release explains who del Toro is and what this exhibit is about,  Monster Kids need no introduction to the filmmaker or his famed Bleak House, the suburban Los Angeles house that serves as his studio and permanent repository of his collection.

Join me now, as we take a virtual tour of Guillermo del Toro’s At Home with Monster...if you dare….

 

“To find beauty in the profane. To elevate the banal. To be moved by genre. These things are vital for my storytelling. This exhibition presents a small fraction of the things that have moved me, inspired me, and consoled me as I transit through life. It’s a devotional sampling of the enormous love that is required to create, maintain, and love the monsters in our lives.”

Guillermo del Toro

 Upon passing through the impressive exhibit entrance way (featured in the videos above), we entered into this large room and were greeted by the life-size Angel of Death from del Toro’s Hell Boy 2: The Golden Army

Guillermo del Toro AT HOME WITH MONSTERS exhibit

A video introduction by Guillermo explains that his Bleak House holds every book he has every owned.  This includes the first book he ever purchased, a horror anthology edited by Forrest J Ackerman, whom del Toro calls his ‘spiritual mentor’ and whose Acker Mansion was the inspiration for del Toro’s Bleak House.  (I filmed this in the exhibit, it is very hard to hear, but you should be able to read the subtitles across the screen):

Click on the image below to read it:

Guillermo del Toro exhibit at Minneapolis Institute of Art

The exhibit is organized into eight thematic sections, and I’ve included images from most of the categories below:

  • Childhood and Innocence, exploring the central role children play in many of del Toro’s films;

Guillermo del Toro 1973 Monster Kid

If you ever needed proof that del Toro is a true member of the fraternity we call “Monster Kid,” this picture should suffice. Note a 10 year-old boy, in self-made monster makeup, terrorizing a willing victim.  Could be anyone (and everyone) who reads this blog.  In this 1973 image, we have Guillermo playing the monster and his sister Susan playing the victim

AT HOME WITH MONSTERS del Toro exhibit

Paintings were prominently featured throughout the exhibit and include original art from his films as well as collected art such as this 1993 Basil Gogos portrait of Boris Karloff as The Monster:

Basil Gogos Frankenstein's Monster 1993

Further evidence of the shared experience of Monster Kids growing up in the 1960s and 70s, Guillermo has collected original and concept art from the films that most inspired him in childhood.  Here. original concept art for the Walt Disney animated classic Legend of Sleepy Hollow:

LEGEND OF SLEEPY HOLLOW concept art Disney

Passing into the next themed collection,

  • Victoriana, which loosely references the Romantic, Victorian, and Edwardian ages, as well as latter-day interpretations of the Victorian era;

Uncle Creepy and Cousin Eerie Portraits

Victorian-styled portraits of Warren Publishing’s iconic horror hosts, Uncle Creepy and Cousin Eerie

  • Magic, Alchemy, and the Occult, exploring the many puzzles, talismans, secret keys, and quests for forbidden knowledge that appear in del Toro’s films;

Concept Art from Disney's FANTASIA

Incredible original art from Disney’s seminal classic FANTASIA.

  • Rain Room, a recreation of a favorite spot in Bleak House, the suburban Los Angeles home that houses del Toro’s personal collection, featuring a false window and special effects to simulate a perpetual thunderstorm—the best atmosphere for del Toro’s creative process;

Lifesize Edgar Allen Poe AT HOME WITH MONSTERS

Throughout the exhibit, we encounter life-size and life-like figures from del Toro’s films and history. Here, in the Rain Room, Edgar Allen Poe sits and reflects on whatever horrors fill his mind.  So incredibly lifelike, I doubt I would sleep well should I ever have the opportunity to spend the night in Bleak House.  He didn’t move at least…while I was watching.

  • Movies, Comics, and Pop Culture, delving into the scope of del Toro’s obsession with comic books and cinema, from B-movies and horror films to works by directors Alfred Hitchcock and Luis Buñuel;
  • Click image below to read it:

Movies Comics Pop Culture Room del Toro exhibit

My pace quickened, and smile broadened, as I entered this phase of the exhibit.  There is little I love more than monster magazines and comic books of my childhood. Since Guillermo and I are of the same generation, our childhood experiences are once again shared.  Two walls lined with vintage copies of Famous Monsters of Filmland, Where Monsters Dwell and so much more:

Monster Magazines and Comics from del Toro's Collection

Wall of Monster Magazines del Toro

I lingered here for a long time, relishing the nostalgia of these books, many…most?..of which I have in my personal collection still.  My sense of kinship with a fellow collector was strong as I stood among this display and seeing these books treated as works of art was moving.  Of course, we know they are art in the truest sense, but watching other exhibit patrons take them in in all their pop culture glory made me feel a sense of pride — even ownership– in these reflections of my childhood experience.

When I finally urged myself to move forward, I was greeted by even more; including this gorgeous Basil Gogos portrait of the Metaluna Mutant:

Metaluna Mutant Basil Gogos 1993

And this spellbinding painting titled “Ray Harryhausen: Master of Fantasy”  by Daniel Horne:

Ray Harryhausen Master of Fantasy painting del Toro exhibit

  • Frankenstein and Horror, revealing del Toro’s lifelong love affair with the tale of Dr. Frankenstein and his monster;

AT HOME WITH MONSTERS exhibit at Minneapolis Institute of Art

The Frankenstein Monster was a common thread throughout the exhibited del Toro’s affection for this most misunderstood of monsters is obvious.  From Gogos portraits, to life size figures from Bride of Frankenstein, the Universal Studios version was everywhere:

The Monster, His Bride and The Doctor

But other master works were present, including original art from Bernie Wrightson‘s classic FRANKENSTEIN:

Bernie Wrightson's FRANKENSTEIN original art

Attending the opening night gala and being among the first to see At Home With Monsters at MIA was a real treat. I took my time (and walked the exhibit multiple times), but I still feel like I didn’t see everything because there is a lot to see in this exhibit.

It’s true that parts of the exhibit,  such as the Victoriana room, didn’t connect with me.  But that simply shows how personal this exhibit is to del Toro. Every collector is drawn to things for personal reasons and they don’t have to be justified to be meaningful.  This is a very personal look at one of our most talented artists and yet every Monster Kid who visits will feel a deep sense of the familiar and a kinship with one of our own.  I assure you, this Monster Kid is already planning my repeat visit and I highly recommend you make every effort to see it while you can!

(News) We’re Nominated for Rondo Hatton Classic Horror Awards

Collecting Classic Monsters Nominated for    Best Blog & Website of 2016

Rondo Hatton Classic Horror Awards

For the past 15 years, the Rondo Hatton Classic Horror Awards have honored the best in classic horror research, creativity and film preservation.  The awards are the brainchild of David Colton, founder of the Classic Horror Film Board, and the spectacular sculpt of the iconic actor Rondo Hatton is by legendary artist Kerry Gammill.  

I have voted in the Rondos for years and ! was completely shocked to see this little work of passion of mine nominated for the Best Website/Blog category this year — I don’t even know who nominated us, but I am so grateful.  I found out about our nomination as I was reviewing the ballot over the weekend!  It isn’t an exaggeration to say that I shouted in surprise when I saw our website included among the very best of the web! What an honor!

See the full ballot here.

What are the Rondo Hatton Classic Horror Awards?

Rondo Hatton Classic Horror Awards

Rondo Awards founder, David Colton, explains it best in a recent interview on Dr Gangrene’s Mad Mad Mad Blog:

The Rondo Awards are an effort to honor and recognize those people and projects that keep the classic horror genre alive and vibrant. It is not so much about ‘favorite actor’ or ‘favorite monster’ but about the latest scholarship in books and magazines, the fun and creativity in writing, art, music, special events and horror hosts like yourself, and in the efforts to preserve the classic films.

Every vote is our attempt to thank and recognize all the creative people — fans and pros alike — who work so hard, often without any pay at all — to keep the classic monster genre young and vital.

Classic Horror Film Board 2016 Rondo Award Ballot

Who Can Vote?

Short answer: everyone! To cast your vote in this year’s Rondo Awards, simply copy and paste the ballot into an email and send it to David Colton at taraco@aol.com by 12AM Midnight, April 16, 2017.

You aren’t required to vote in every category to participate so vote for what you know and love!  To view the official ballot of the 15th Annual Rondo Hatton Classic Horror Awards, click here.

It’s truly an honor to be nominated, but it would  fantastic to win too! I’ll stop short of groveling, but I would really appreciate your vote and spreading the word about our nomination.  We are in a very competitive category with a lot of great websites and blogs, so every vote helps.  Regardless of who you vote for, we hope you will take the time to cast your vote and spread the word.

Cast your vote for the 15th Annual Rondo Hatton Classic Horror Awards! 

Related Articles:

Championship Round: Classic Monster Magazine Challenge

We Started With 16 Classic Monster Magazines; Only Two Remain

FMoF-vs-MonsterWorld

We started with 16 classic monster magazines from the heyday of Monster Kid-dom.  Over the course of several months, we’ve pitted two magazines against each other and readers have selected their favorite magazine.  16 became 8 and then 8 was whittled to four.  Now, only two magazines remain and one will claim the title of Champion of the Classic Monster Magazine Challenge.

Screenshot 2017-01-23 14.53.14

Not surprisingly, Warren Publishing is represented in the championship round.  The underdog MONSTER WORLD defeated the iconic CASTLE OF FRANKENSTEIN to make it the the championship round against Warren’s essential magazine FAMOUS MONSTERS OF FILMLAND.  So we have an all-Warren finale: MONSTER WORLD vs FAMOUS MONSTERS.

We know one Warren title will claim the championship, but which one will it be?  As always, join us on our Facebook page or Twitter to cast your vote!

Justin Ishmael’s Awesome 2-Headed Giant Vinyl Figure

Inspired by Ron Cobb’s Iconic FM 1968 Fearbook Cover

Famous Monsters 1968 YearbookGalligantus-Many-SidesGalligantus Vinyl Figure Multiple Side Views

Former Mondo creative director Justin Ishmael, who licensed Cobb’s artwork from Famous Monsters, is thrilled to announce his 12-inch tall Galligantus soft vinyl figure!

Famous-Monsters-1968-Fearbook

Galligantus is the fist Japanese vinyl piece Ishmael has released. The original sculpt is by Handsome Taro and sofubi cast is by Luke “Grody Shogun” Rook.

Jack-Giant-Slayer-FM-Fearbook-68-Vinyl-ToyGalligantus 2-Headed Giant VinylFamous Monsters 1968 Yearbook

Galligantus is the first of Ishmael’s new “Make-A-Monster” series, which is inspired by the classic model kits we all love.  Your kit arrives unassembled in a vintage-style model kit style box, filled with the nine pieces that make the 2-Headed Giant, and then you simply slot them together — possibly with the help of a hair dryer to warm the vinyl, but no glue needed at all!

Cast in glow-in-the-dark vinyl, this monstrous beast comes with a spiked ball mace on a chain and assembly instructions featuring artwork by Ken Landgraf.

FM-Giant-Pre-Order

Available now  for preorder on Justin’s website , these $200 apiece works will begin shipping in early 2017.

Classic Monster Magazine Final Four

Classic Monster Magazine Final Four BracketWho Will Be Champion of the Monster Magazines?

We took a break from the action with during the holidays but it’s time to pick up where we left off – the Final Four in our Classic Monster Magazine Challenge!

You may recall we kicked off the Classic Monster Magazine Challenge in October with 16 of the coolest (and corniest) monster magazines from the 1960s and 70s. Over the course of several weeks, readers chose their favorite magazine in daily head-to-head battles.  As the field of 16 became 8 and, now, four.

The four magazines still standing are certainly worthy of the honor:

Monster World

Castle of Frankenstein

Famous Monsters of Filmland

The Monster Times

 

All unique, all meaningful and important in their own way to us monster kids.  But only one can claim the brass ring — in the contrived world of championships, the contest must continue until only one remains.  The choice, dear readers, is entirely yours.

Be sure to Like CCM on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.  We will post the head-to-head contests each day on those two social networks where you can cast your vote.

 

Saving Rudolph – Monster Kid Christmas Memories

A Most Wonderful Time of the Year!Santa and Rudolph Stop Motion PuppetsSanta and Rudolph Stop-Motion PuppetsSanta & Rudolph PuppetsSanta and Rudolph Stop-Motion Puppets

We celebrate all the things that made the 1960s and 70s a great time to be a kid.   With Halloween wrapped, our attention turned to that next great day on the calendar.  Monster Kids love Christmas and the holidays. After all, that’s when we often got some of our most cherished things! From Thanksgiving weekend through December, those of us growing up in 1960s and 70s took to the TV Guide to look for more than monster movies – we were equally excited for those once-a-year Christmas specials. The stop motion animation was familiar ground for us Monster Kids who loved the work of Harryhausen and O’Brien.

This is the story of what happened to the stop-motion puppets used to make the classic Rankin/Bass Christmas special Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer.

Turns out that, in the early 1960s, stop-motion puppets weren’t considered that important. The 9-inch tall Claus and 5-inch tall reindeer puppet that were used in the making of this 1964 Rankin/Bass production wound up spending the next 40 years under less than ideal conditions.

First NBC (which initially aired this holiday special on December 6, 1964 on its General Electric Fantasy Hour program) had these puppets shipped from Japan to New York City so that they could then be used as part of the publicity campaign for this program. Once that work was done, Santa and Rudolph were returned to Arthur Rankin, Jr. and Jules Bass (i.e. the two executives who ran Videocraft International, Ltd., the production company that actually made Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer).  And eventually Arthur and Jules gifted these two puppets to one of Rankin/Bass’s longtime secretaries.

Rudolph puppet spent 40 years as Christmas decoration
Rudolph puppet spent 40 years as Christmas decorationRudolph Puppet as Christmas Decoration

“And she then made Santa and Rudolph part of her family’s holiday decorations,” explained Seamus Walsh, one of the modern stop-motion masters who now works at Screen Novelties, a Los Angeles-based animation studio which later played a key role in these puppets’ restoration. “And that secretary’s children and grandchildren then spent the next 40 years or so playing really roughly with Rudolph and Santa. Throwing that little reindeer puppet through the air pretending that he could fly and force-feeding Santa candy and chocolate.”
In the end, the Rudolph puppet wound up with a snapped neck. Not to mention a missing glowing red nose. And poor Santa lost his fluffy white eyebrows as well as half his mustache. And since that they no longer looked like the characters who had appeared in that now-classic holiday special, Santa and Rudolph were retired to the attic.

And they probably would have stayed there — alone and forgotten like those forlorn playthings on the Island of Misfit Toys — if it hadn’t been for the secretary’s nephew, who stumbled upon Rudolph and Santa up in the family’s attic in 2005. He decided to bring this stop-motion puppets on PBS’s Antiques Roadshow and find out what they might now possibly be worth.

At that time, Santa and Rudolph were appraised for $8,000 – $10,000 for the pair. The secretary’s nephew then decided to sell these holiday icons to Kevin A. Kriess, a lifelong fan of the Rankin/Bass TV specials. And Kriess’ first goal was to restore these stop-motion puppets to pristine condition.

“Which is why Kevin then reached out to us. Or — rather — my wife Robin, who handles restoration for the Center of Puppetry Arts in Atlanta,” Walsh continued. “And she was the one who then handled all of the restoration work that needed to be done on the Santa and Rudolph puppets.”

Restoring Santa Claus Puppet

Robin took an almost Hippocratic approach to this restoration project. Gently peeling back Rudolph’s tattered fur to reveal the wood & lead wire armature that the talented Japanese artists who was originally built this stop-motion puppet back in the early 1960s had created.

Restoring Santa Claus Puppet“While my wife was working on Rudolph, I got the opportunity to look at this puppet up-close several times. I mean, how could I not? This was the character that actually inspired me to get into stop-motion animation,” Seamus said. “But to be able to hold a huge piece of your childhood in your hand like that and then get a close enough look at Rudolph’s hooves to see the tiny little holes where they’d used entomology pins to secure this puppet’s feet to the set. Or to realize that Rudolph’s eyes were just these tiny pieces of leather that the Japanese animators had to then move around by hand in each shot, that was just mind-blowing.”

2012-12-24-Rudolph3

Kriess eventually sold Santa and Rudolph to noted pop culture collector Peter Lutrario. And the last time these stop-motion puppets were seen publicly was during a December 2010 broadcast of Syfy’s Hollywood Treasures show. And at that time, Lutrario told Joe Maddalena — the owner of Profiles in History auction house — that he just wasn’t ready to part with these holiday icons.

“Which is unfortunate. I mean, I’m glad that Santa and Rudolph are now in good hands and aren’t being left to rot in some attic,” Seamus explained. “But that said, I’d still love to see those stop-motion puppets to someday wind up in a place like the Smithsonian. So that thousands of people — rather than just one man — would then get to regularly see Santa and Rudolph and appreciate these puppets for the pieces of pop culture history that they are.”
We’re glad they are being well-tended to and hope that, like all private collections, they occasionally get a public viewing for the rest of us to enjoy.

(Video) Mark Hamill’s Pop Culture Quest Trailer

Less Than One Week Until This Geek Collector Series Premieres!

Contrary to public perception, collecting is a social sport.  One of the most enjoyable aspects of being a collector is being part of the larger collector community.  Thanks to social media, the proliferation of collector events and comic-cons, collectors have an abundance of options to commune over every collectible imaginable.  It’s always a treat to see pictures of other collectors’ stuff – from new finds to creative displays.  Now, we have our own TV series hosted by Luke Skywalker himself, Mark Hamill.

Turns out Mark is a collector himself and his new series will feature him visiting some majorly impressive collectors as well as taking us behind the scenes of some of our favorite pop culture creators.  The show is called Mark Hamill’s Pop Culture Quest and if debuts on November 15 on Comic-ConHQ, the streaming service owned by San Diego Comic Con.

Yep — you saw that right, Mark is going to take us for a tour of Bob’s basement with the one-and-only Bob Burns! The series’ Executive Producer and vintage monster toy collector Scott Kinney assured me that there are LOTS of monster goodies in this first season.

You have to subscribe to watch the show, but it’s free for 30 days, so binge the first season and then you decide if you want to keep the subscription.  You can subscribe at Comic-ConHQ.com

 

Celebrate October with Our Classic Monster Magazine Challenge

The Greatest Classic Monster Magazine of All Time? You Decide!

Classic Monster Magazine Challenge Bracket

It’s October.  Or, as we call it here at CCM, The 31 Days of Halloween. No matter what you call it, we can all agree it’s the most wonderful time of year and to celebrate, we’re hosting our first-ever March-Madness style competition featuring those classic monster magazines of the 1960s and 70s.

Each day for the rest of the month, we will pit  2 classic monster movie magazines against each other and you, fellow Monster Kids, will choose who goes home and who lives to fight another day. The competition will occur on  the Collecting Classic Monsters Twitter and Facebook pages.

To participate, just follow us on Twitter @CollectMonsters or Like us on Facebook.com/CollectingClassicMonsters  where we will post the daily competition,  announce the previous day’s winner and share details on each magazine title included in this year’s challenge.

In case you’re wondering why certain magazines aren’t included, here’s the criteria used for our selection:

  • originally published beginning during the primary Monster Kid era of the 1960s and 70s
  • First issue appeared prior to 1980
  • Editorial focus on Classic Monsters and Monster Kid genre films, not Horror or Sci-Fi exclusively
  • Magazines must be editorial/fanzine focused rather than comic anthologies such as Creepy or Vampirella

That said, let us know if there are glaring omissions from our list so we can include them in our next competition — there’s no grand prize here; just some fun in the digital clubhouse for Monster Kids and Collectors.

And while you’re at it, check out our Monster Magazine Archives to read up on all the past articles we’ve written about one of our favorite collectible categories!