All posts by georgemcgowan

Jaws Collectibles & Movie Memorabilia

Jaws Collectibles and Movie Memorabilia

 

Last week, I profiled the classic art of the Jaws original movie poster one-sheet and it got me thinking about other collectible for this iconic movie.

I was too young to see Jaws at the theater, but I wasn’t too young to have all kinds of Jaws merchandise.  The movie that defined the term “Summer Blockbuster” also had its version of the requisite licensing blitz that accompanies all blockbusters these days.

Over the next few posts, I’ll profile Jaws merchandise and collectibles from the 1970s through the present day.  I thought it would be fun to start this series with a  few of the more interesting collectibles from the 1970s, so here we go:

Collegeville Halloween Costume

Jaws Collegeville Halloween Costume

I honestly don’t recall this costume as a kid, maybe because it’s just so preposterous that no one I knew got one.  I’m strangely drawn to it now.   With it’s weird eye holes in the mouth perspective, the mask and smock actually re-create the movie poster in a way that I don’t recall costumes doing before this.

Collegeville Costume Vintage Comic Ad 1975

I always loved the way Ben Cooper and Collegeville would include character art and names on the smock in the 1970s rather than simply recreate the character’s costume.  I suppose this is along those same lines as the belly of a shark would make for an even more bizarre costume smock than the art they actually used.

This costume shows up on auction sites on occasion but none were available as I was writing this article.  This is one of the higher valued costumes from the 1970s with recent auctions going for over $300 making this one of the more valuable of all vintage Jaws collectibles.

Jaws Lunchbox

Jaws Lunchbox

Nothing gets me ready for lunch more than thinking about a giant shark munching on a lovely swimmer, but apparently that didn’t stop swarms of school kids from toting this iconic lunch box to school.  I do remember this as a kid, though I never had one– I was representing  Planet of the Apes at the time.    These show up at auction with some regularity and tend to be reasonably affordable, usually in the $30 -$60 range.  Understandably, prices tend to be on the higher end of this range when the thermos is included, as this makes a complete set.

CORRECTION:  Thanks to the information provided by a reader, I need to correct this article.  Turns out, I don’t really remember a Jaws lunch box from my elementary school days after all because it wasn’t released until 2011!  NECA limited production to 10,000 creating scarcity and collectibility with this item, explaining it’s $30-$60 price-range these days.  I do my research when I write these articles, but it really helps when a reader corrects my information.

7-Eleven Jaws Slurpee Cups

Jaws Slurpee Cup 1975 7-Eleven

In the 70s, I spent my summers at my Grandmother’s place in North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina and made the trek to the local 7-Eleven almost daily.  I bought my comics and monster mags there and supplemented my daily nutrition with cherry slurpees all summer long.  I loved the promotional plastic cups for the Marvel and DC super heroes and I remember these Jaws cups like it was yesterday.  Today, these are pretty easy to come by and usually sell in the $10-15 range for cups in very good condition.

Tomorrow, we’ll take a look at some Official Jaws merchandise toys and games.

Famous Monsters of Filmland #10 Digital for Kindle

 

Breaking News!  Famous Monsters of Filmland for Kindle

Famous Monsters of Filmland #10

Famous Monsters of Filmland #10               October, 1962

There’s really nothing quite like the old Famous Monsters of Filmland magazines from the 1960s.  I’ve been collecting this title for most of my life, but some issues I have never been able to get my hands on.  Issue #10, for example.

Well, Warren just solved that problem for me by releasing a digital version of this magazine for Kindle over at Amazon.  I’m hoping it’s the first of many issues to come.

I’ll keep looking for a high-grade copy of this issue for my collection — but now I can read it while continuing my search!

Thanks, Warren!

 

Classic Monster Magazines

 Classic Monster Magazines

Every few weeks, I will go in-depth on a classic monster magazine from my personal collection. We’ll kick this new series off with one of one my favorite comic book monsters, the Man Thing …

Monsters Unleashed #5

Marvel Comics Group, April 1974

Monsters Unleashed! Magazine April 1974. Cover art by Bob Larkin

Fantastic Cover by Bob Larkin

Printed on the interior of both the front and back covers, a poster of the “most startling swamp creature of all” which, of course, you had to remove the cover to hang!

IMG_3441

Special Bonus: Giant-Size Man-Thing Pin-Up  

a double-page pin up of everyone’s favorite swamp creature, ready to hang on your bedroom wall and drip slime over your carpet

Magazine Contents

Man-Thing: All the Faces of Fear  

a horror from the past comes back to haunt the Man-Thing…and this time only one of them can possibly survive.

  • Written by Tony Isabella
  • Art by Vincente Alcazar

Man-Thing: All the Faces of Fear from Monsters Unleashed #5

Great splash page of the Man-Thing battling a pack of gators in the swamp apparently to protect that  mysterious leggy cloaked woman standing in the background.

Man-Thing

I’ve always been a Man-Thing guy–Swamp Thing just looked too human for me.  But Man-Thing is clearly a creature of the swamp, a muck monster.  With his trip-tentacled face and black eyes, he fit right into my empathetic + frightening formula for a classic monster. I’m still a sucker for any comic with him in it.

The Golden Voyage of Sinbad                                                                                                              

Review and reflections of the brand new Columbia/Harryhausen epic.

  • Written by Gerry Conway

Golden Voyage of Sinbad - Monsters Unleashed! 1974

Peter Stubb: Werewolf
  • Written by Tony Isabella
  • Art by Ron Wilson

Peter Snubb: Werewolf! Monsters Unleashed #5 1974

The Dark Passage

Nick Raftis was a murderer.  He was tried, convicted, and jailed. Then Nick escaped…only to be hunted by the very ones he killed.

Dark Passage - Monsters Unleashed 1974

Glenn Strange, Frankenstein: Monster fo Dodge City

Recently, he starred on TV’s Gunsmoke as Sam the Bartender. But to monster fans everywhere, he will be remembered as the Frankenstein Monster. A tribute to the late Mr. Strange by expert Don Glut.

  • Written by Don Glut

Monsters Unleashed Curtis Magazines Marvel Comics

Demon of Slaughter Mansion

Twice before we’ve promised this story. Twice before it failed to see print.  Now, at last, you can finally read the terror-tale that was too hot to publish.

  • Written by Don McGregor
  • Art by Juan Boix/Pablo Marcos

Demon of Slaughter Mansion - Monsters Unleashed! Marvel 1974

Monsters in the Media

An in-depth look behind the movies, the books and the television plays that have been bombarding you in the past, and will be clawing your way in the future.

  • Written by Carla Joseph

Monster in the Media - Monsters Unleashed! #5 1974

The Werewolf Tale to End All Werewolf Tales!

A honeymoon is not the best time to track down a monster. Yet, what happens when a monster tracks down you?

Werewolf Tale to End All Werewolf Tales - Monsters Unleashed! 1974

Frankenstein 1974: Once a Monster…

His mind is no longer his own, for it has been transplanted into the body of a monster…and Own Wallach can do nothing but scream in horror..or resort to – murder. A Frankenstein special.

  • Written by Gary Friedrich
  • Art by  John Buscema/Winslow  Mortimer

Frankenstein 1974: Once a Monster.... from Monsters Unleashed #5

Curtis Magazines

was the name of an imprint used by Marvel Comics to publish black and white magazines between 1971 and 1975.   Marvel saw the success Warren was having with their black-and-white Horror anthology magazines and wanted a piece of the action.   Marvel’s editor, Stan Lee, and the mighty Marvel Bullpen were challenging Comic Code authority through their mainstream color comic books with stories about drug abuse in Amazing Spider-Man and the like. Magazines, however, were outside the Comic Code’s jurisdiction entirely making them fertile ground for edgier subject matter like horror and monsters.

The paper stock Marvel used was pretty low quality compared to their color comic pages, and finding VF+ grade books from the Curtis imprint is no small feat.  They’ve appreciated in value nicely over time.

Monster Magazine subscription ad- Marvel Monsters Unleashed! 1974

Collectors Value:

Monsters Unleashed #5 has a increased in value nicely over the years, with NM currently priced around $39.   My personal copy, which you see in the scans on this post, is in Very Fine condition and valued at around $26.

Summary

I started buying comics when I was 4 years old and loved the circular racks at my local convenience store.  I drifted to the magazine rack through the gateways of Mad and Cracked magazines as well as the Treasury Edition comic books that were too big for the comic rack.  It was then that I discovered the brave new world of Warren and all these great anthologies, now classic monster magazines.  My parents just thought they were oversize comics and I had no problem getting them — Vampirella was a different story, but then the covers usually gave the contents of those books away to parents.

I still love these classic monster magazines with their fantastic painted covers featuring some great monsters.  The combination of 1950s horror comics together with original stories from the 1970s only enhance the charm for me since I wasn’t around the great over-the-top horror comics of the 1950s.  In short, these magazines mean a lot to me and always will.

CLASSIC MOVIE POSTERS GALLERY – JAWS

Classic Movie Posters Gallery

Jaws Movie Poster One-Sheet

Jaws (Universal, 1975). One Sheet (27″ X 41″)

This week’s installment in our Classic Movie Poster Gallery celebrates it’s 40th anniversary this week, the movie that turned a day at the beach into a national nightmare, Jaws.

Credited as the first summer blockbuster, Jaws was a phenomenon and the poster art played a big part in the feeding frenzy.  The poster art, painted by Roger Kastel, originally appeared on the Bantam paperback for the best-selling book by Peter Benchley.  Universal Studios knew this film was going to be huge and looked at numerous designs before ultimately deciding that the book art was simply unbeatable.

Jaws paperback book cover Bantam

Universal smudged out the nudity that had been a controversial on the smaller book cover and enhanced  the impact by changing the title letters from the pale blue of the paperback to the dramatic blood red we all know today.

The resulting poster, with Kastel’s dramatic realistic style, the dramatic use of color and the exaggerated scale of the shark, is simply one of the most iconic images in the history of cinema.

Unfortunately, Kastel’s original 20×30 painting went missing during the book tour for the movie release.  This painting would be extremely valuable today, but it has never been recovered .  Read more about this unfortunate event at Collectors Weekly.

Poster Value

This poster has good availability in higher grades and is not out of reach for serious collectors.  While I found several listed at over $1,000, I also found numerous listings below worth checking out.

Given the iconic design and lasting critical impact of this film, owning an original Jaws one-sheet seems like a pretty safe collectible investment to me.

A couple of these posters are listed on eBay starting at $750

A Private collector is offering a Very Fine poster for $850 at Heritage Auctions


 

Summary

The summer blockbuster season is upon us, as is our annual family trip to the beach.   Jaws is being re-released at the theaters in June, and I plan to be there, re-living one of the great monster movies of the last 50 years and the grandaddy of the summer blockbuster.


FUNKO REACTION UNIVERSAL MONSTERS – RONDO AWARDS 2015 BEST TOY NOMINEE

Collecting the Rondo Awards 2015 Best Toy Category – Part 10

Funko ReAction Universal Monsters Collection

This is the final installment in my review of the 2014 nominees for the Best Toy, Model, Collectible category of the Rondo Hatton Horror Awards and we finish with the most classic of all monsters –the Funko ReAction Universal Monsters.Funko ReAction Universal Monsters

In 2013,  Funko and  Super 7 partnered to bring Kenner’s unreleased 1979 Alien prototypes to market.  It wasn’t long afterwards that Funko announced a full “ReAction” line of retro 3 ¾” action figures based on characters from 1980’s cult, sci-fi and horror cinema: Escape From New YorkBack to the FutureTerminator, a Rocketeer figure, iconic horror villains as well as the Universal Monsters.  These news collections were designed as an homage to classic Kenner Star Wars action figures of the 1970s and early 80s.

Controversy

The retro style has been a bit controversial as these figures have been panned by some for the lack of detailed likeness to the actors/character.  Funko even extended that feeling of “vintage-ness” through the packaging, which is the same size as the original Kenner packaging from the late ’70s /early ’80s. This has also met with some push-back by collectors who find the side-panel style packaging a challenge to display.

Reis O’Brien, Funko’s head designer of the ReAction line, explained the design inspiration for these figures in this quote from the FunkoFanatic Reaction Forum:

We did originally look towards the first run of Kenner Star Wars figures for inspiration, especially when we first got started, so that’s why you’ll see that our Terminator and Snake Plissken sort or mimic that “softness”, but as we went on, things got a little more detailed, a little closer to ROTJ figures, which you’ll see in the Universal Monsters and Horror lines. Basically, we think there’s a sweet spot somewhere in there that we keep trying to hit. But Kenner remains our main inspiration as opposed to, say, Remco or Mego. But they have their charm, too.

I buy that logic fully and think that they nailed the retro styling of the characters.  I particularly like the packaging, though finding them in pristine condition on store pegs has also been a frustration for collectors.

Funko ReAction-Universal Monsters Packaging Back of Card

There are a lot of great reviews on these figures already published and, frankly, from folks with greater expertise then me.  For your reading please, here’s a great review from one of my go-to resources for collectible toys,  Brian Heller at Plaid Stallions.

Here’s the Funko ReAction Universal Monsters collection, in order of theatrical appearance:

Funko ReAction Phantom of the Opera

Funky ReAction Phantom of the Opera

from The Phantom of the Opera (1925)

Funko ReAction Dracula

Funko ReAction Dracula

from Dracula (1931)

Funko ReAction Frankenstein's MonsterFunko ReAction Frankenstein’s Monster

from Frankenstein (1931)

Funko ReAction The Mummy

Funko ReAction The Mummy

from The Mummy (1932)

Funko ReAction The Invisible Man

Funko ReAction Invisible Man

from The Invisible Man (1933)

Funko ReAction Bride of Frankenstein

Funko ReAction Bride of Frankenstein

from The Bride of Frankenstein (1932)

Funko ReAction Wolf Man Funko ReAction Wolf Man

from The Wolf Man (1941)

Funko ReAction Creature from the Black Lagoon

Funko ReAction Creature from the Black Lagoon

from The Creature from the Black Lagoon (1954)

Product Details

  • 3 ¾” action figures
  • Five points of articulation
  • bubble photo card
  • MSRP: $9.99 each

Chase Variants

Like all variants, forced scarcity is either the bane or the blessing of the completist collector.  The glow variants  were limited to one figure per every six cases and the clear Invisible Man was an Entertainment Earth exclusive.

Funko ReAction Glow VariantFunky ReAction Mummy Glow in the Dark

Funko-ReAction-Invisible-Man-Clear-Variant

Entertainment Earth exclusive                                    Invisible Man Transparent Variant

Funko ReAction Creature from the Black Lagoon

Creature from the Black Lagoon Glow Variant


Where to Buy Funko ReAction Universal Monsters Collection

These figures are available near and far, so the real goal is finding them at the best price.  They have been in the market long enough that they are widely available on secondary resale sites like eBay, but prices have increase because they are still available at retail prices in most stores.  This makes it a buyers market for these figures.

EntertainmentEarth

Amazon offers a full set of figures:

  •  8 figure set includes Dracula, Frankenstein, the Mummy, the Wolfman, Creature from the Black Lagoon, the Phantom of the Opera, Bride of Frankenstein, and the Invisible Man
  • Numerous sellers competing on price, with lowest being $75.48 shipping included ($9.44 per figure)

EBay

Good availability of the Mummy Glow-in-the-Dark Variant starting at $14.99

Best Price I’ve found on the Clear Invisible Man Variant — listed at $9.99 with 7 in stock

Lots of Glow Creature variant figures as well, starting at $19.99


Summary

While I appreciate that modern toy collectors have gotten used to incredible like-like sculpts, the fact that this line is inspired by 1970’s and 80’s toys is central to the design style.  My Han Solo figure from Kenner didn’t really look like Harrison Ford in 1978 and I didn’t care; I loved it completely and totally.

I think the ReACTION line would have missed the mark if the figures were too realistic.  They certainly wouldn’t have been as retro, so I’m fine with the less-then-realistic sculpts.  In short, I think Funko nailed these figures.

My favorites are pretty much in line with my favorite monsters; The Creature and The Wolf Man were the two “must-own” figures for me.  I was surprised by how much I liked the Invisible Man too.  So far, those are the only three I’ve purchased, but this review has me re-considering the variants, at lease for the Gillman and Invisible Man.

These are priced really well.  So well, in fact, that I got my kids a couple of the figures to open and —gasp– actually play with!

As a child of the 1970’s, who owned the original Kenner Star Wars figures, these bring back waves and waves of nostalgia.  As an adult  vintage monster toy collector, I love how these figures fit right into my collection.  I don’t tend to buy many modern monster toys or collectibles, simply because I focus my limited collecting budget on high-grade vintage pieces.

So thumbs up on the figures from me all the way around–design, price, packaging — Funko nailed it.  And with the recent announcement of the Jaws and Gremlins series, looks like we’ve got lots to look forward to from Funko ReAction.

Let me know your thoughts– do you like the retro style of the Funko ReAction Universal Monsters line or do you prefer the more sophisticated style of modern collectibles?

Happy Frankenstein Friday!

TGIFrankenstein, Folks!

And this week, we’re going hormonal with the Teenage Monster in a really cool reason bust from Executive Replicas — this thing is 3/4 scale and stands 18 inches tall!!
Teenage Frankestein Bust

Product Details

  • Height: 18-inches
  • 200 piece Limited edition
  • Resin
  • 3/4 Scale
  • Pre-painted
  • MSRP: $249.99

Expand your classic horror film collection! From  I Was a Teenage Frankestein (1957) and How to Make a Monster (1958), it’s the one-and-only Teenage Frankenstein.

This resin I Was a Teenage Frankenstein from Executive Replicas offers the misunderstood monster in incredible life-like detail and scale.  

Order I Was a Teenage Frankenstein Bust from Entertainment Earth!

Update May 2017:  This bust is sold out at retail and is only available on the secondary market (at least as far as I could find).  Here are links to a few of these that I found for sale or auction:

 

 

 

CLASSIC MOVIE POSTERS GALLERY – THE ROBOT MONSTER

Classic Movie Posters Gallery

Robot Monster One-Sheet Movie PosterThe Robot Monster (Astor Pictures, 1953) Style A One Sheet (27″ X 41″)

 

In my last post, I reviewed a toy inspired by this movie.  As I was writing that review, I did quite a bit of research on this film and thought it worthy of being this week’s installment in our Classic Movie Poster Gallery.

This 1953 science fiction romp is frequently cited as one of the worst, or at least silliest, movies ever made. Twenty-five-year-old writer/director Phil Tucker made Robot Monster in four days for an estimated $16,000. Most footage was filmed outdoors in Bronson Canyon, the site of innumerable motion pictures and TV settings, including It Conquered the World (1956), Earth vs the Spider (1958) and in more recent times, Army of Darkness (1992) and The Lost Skeleton of Cadavera (2001).

Robot Monster‍ ’​s budget was so low , Tucker couldn’t afford a robot costume as intended, so he hired his friend George Barrows, who had made his own gorilla suit, to play Ro-Man; Tucker then added the space helmet.

Robot Monster‍ ’​s special effects include stock footage used from 1940’s One Million , 1951’s Lost Continent, and Flight to Mars. Also spliced into the film is view screen footage with a brief appearance of the Rocketship X-M (1950) spaceship boarding; a matte painting of the ruins of New York City was also included from Captive Women (1952).

Robot Monster 1953

In spite of the minuscule budget and garage sale monster costume, the 3-D in the film is considered well-crafted, according to Jeff Joseph, organizer of the World 3d Film Expo in Hollywood. “Robot Monster is actually well-shot,’ he says, “and the 3-D is spectacularly good.”

Poster Value

This film flopped at the box-office, grossing $1,000,000 and received extremely limited distribution.  As a result, the posters are quite rare.  Further impacting scarcity and value, most theaters didn’t show the movie in the intended 3-D and the majority of posters have been restored where “3-D” was marked out or taped over with paper.

While not astronomically valued, the rarity of this poster would lead me to believe that it will continue to increase in worth over time and could be a good investment.

A couple of these posters are listed on eBay, starting at $2,000.  I couldn’t find any recent auctions for this poster to benchmark values against, though Heritage Auctions has sold other poster styles from this film in recent years, including:

Half-Sheet (22″ x 28″) VF Sold for $1,553 in 2009

Robot Monster Half-Sheet movie poster

Banner (24″ x 82″) FN+ Sold for $1,793 in 2012

Robot Monster Movie Banner 1953

 

Summary

This is another example of a really great poster for a really bad movie.   I love how much they’ve crammed into this poster — including love scenes, space ships, battling “dinosaurs” and even added a skull-face to Ro-Man to ramp up the fright.  Never mind that he doesn’t have a skull face in the movie, or that the iguana / “dinosaurs” appear for less than a minute.   Truly a poster from a different era and a great example of over-the-top, B-movie pop art at its finest.

Sputnik Supplies Ro-Boy – Rondo Awards 2015 Best Toy Category Nominee

Collecting the Rondo Awards 2015 Best Toy Category – Part 9

Sputnik Supplies Ro-Boy Vinyl Figure

It seems I’ve been exploring the intersection of iconic monsters and horrible movies in recent posts. In last week’s Classic Movie Poster post, I profiled 1958’s Attack of the 50 Foot Woman  – a bad movie with an iconic and timeless poster.

As we continue to review 2014 Rondo Awards nominees for Best Toy/Model/Collectible, today’s featured collectible certainly fits the bill for iconic monster/bad movie as we take a look at Sputnik Supplies original creation Ro-Boy.  Ro-Boy by Sputnik Supplies

Ro-Boy is a unique blend of the classic Big Boy restaurant mascot

Bobs Big Boy

with the infamous Ro-Man Extension XJ-2 from the campy, not-so-classic 1953 B-movie Robot Monster:Robot Monster

Sputnik Supplies is the brainchild of artist Paul Schiola who explains the inspiration behind his creations as:

“My love for vinyl toys and sculpting led me in a direction where I could meld the two and produce a truly collectible toy…make small runs of cool, unique and truly collectible vinyl-like toys; each one is an individual work of art and is always handmade by me here in the U.S.A.”

Ro-Man Extension XJ-2 is the titular monster and/or alien from The Robot Monster, a film with such a low budget that they used a gorilla suit because they didn’t have the budget for a full robot suit. 

It’s worth noting that the lack of budget and resulting gorilla/robot mash-up is the singular reason this film remains in the popular culture–it certainly isn’t the movie itself!

Product Details

  • Height: 7″
  • Handmade in USA
  • Sculptor: Paul Schiola
  • Hand-painted
  • MSRP: $85

 

Where to Buy Sputnik Supplies Ro-Boy

The only place that I could find this collectible figure was direct from the artist:

Sputnik Supplies Website

Paul offers these limited edition figures @ $85 which includes shipping.

Sputnik Supplies Ro-Boy Rondo Awards nominated Best Collectible 2014
© Sputnik Supplies

Summary

I love this figure.  Of all the nominees in the Rondo Awards category for Best Toy/Model/Collectible, it the only original creation.

While I love licensed merchandise, and am awed by the incredible life-like detail of many models, maquettes and even action figures of today, there is something magical about the discovery of a toy that isn’t from a movie, comic or TV show.

As a kid, it always felt like discovering something uniquely mine.  Obviously, a mass-produced plastic toy wasn’t uniquely mine, but the feeling was pure and joyful just the same.  I think it is one of the original draws I felt to monsters and genre movies in general– the fantastic and original creations of the artists and filmmakers were magical to me and, I suspect, most other monster kids.

I really appreciate that, while inspired by a rather infamous movie monster/alien, Ro-Boy is a creation of the artist’s imagination–and a hand-painted, handmade one at that.

The price point is steep, as it is for most of the nominees in this category.  But, given that this is really a work of pop culture art and is clearly NOT a toy, I’m okay with $85.  I imagine that price will only go up once Sputnik Supply sells the original inventory and it winds up on the secondary market.

The Robot Monster

Speaking of the movie that inspired Ro-Boy,  I watched it last night on Amazon Prime as I was drafting this article.   Honestly, I can’t say for sure if I had ever seen this film in its entirety.

My thoughts?  This movie is so bad it’s good!  It’s not going on my list of favorite films anytime soon, and I love 1950s B-movie SciFi camp.  If you haven’t seen it, it really is  good fun and worth a little over an hour of your time.

You can stream it for free with an Amazon Prime membership:
(click image to watch movie)

or you can watch it for free onYouTube:

 

So what do you think of Ro-Boy?  Any Sputnik Supplies aficionados out there?  And The Robot Monster?  Share your opinions about this movie and the collectible toy it inspired below!

Raising Modern Monster Kids

Can Today’s Kids Still Be Monster Kids?

The term ‘Monster Kid’ is widely applied to generations who grew up during the great monster craze that swept popular culture in America during the 1950s and 1960s.  I came of age in the 1970s and there are plenty of my generation who relate, and adopt, the moniker of Monster Kid as well.

Many of us Monster Kids are far from childhood in our age but have had the privilege of raising kids of our own.  Is it possible to raise modern Monster kids in the digital age?  This Monster Kid Dad is giving it the old college try, with some mixed results.

Through my series, Raising Modern Monster Kids. I’ll keep readers updated on this journey and share my successes – and failures – for all to enjoy.

This is what my 8 year old son wrote in school on Friday:

Raising Modern Monster Kids - 8 year old tells Godzilla's orignRaising Modern Monster Kids 8 year old draws Godzilla

 

As you can tell, my son loves Godzilla.  We saw Godzilla 2014 in the theater last summer and he loved it.  But that wasn’t the first Godzilla movie he saw.  No, Terror of Mechagodilla, King Kong vs Godzilla, Godzilla vs Mothra, Destroy All Monsters, Godzilla: Final Wars and Son of Godzilla all preceded the Legendary reboot in my son’s Godzilla movie viewing.  He’s 8 and he calls out the monsters as guys in suits, but once the giant monster brawls begin, he doesn’t care.

I really liked Legendary’s Godzilla  and I’m okay if this new version becomes my son’s preferred Godzilla.  He’ll have to make his own choices. All I can do is make sure he is exposed to the classic movies that inspired the reboot and hope that he falls for them like I did.

I’m optimistic that I can raise modern monster kids who love the new but treasure the classic.

This one is clearly in the ‘Win’ column!  Enjoy and Happy Memorial Day to all you Monster Kids — young and old!

Howl Through Wednesday with the Wolf Man Collectibles

 Wolf Man Collectibles to Help You Have a Howling Hump Day

The Wolf Man CollectionI’m a Wolf Man fan and have been all my life, so I thought I’d share a few pieces from my Wolf Man collection

Starting from the left, we have my custom clay Wolf Man face sculpture  (sans one fang) that I made in 4th grade art class — still love it in spite of it’s obvious amateur flaws

In the center, my 1963 Wolf Man Soaky from Colgate-Palmolive

On the right, my 2009 Funko Force Wolf Man (despite the fact that the package says “The Werewolf”)

We’re half-way through the week and that is enough to get me howling at the moon — have a great day!

What are your favorite Wolf Man collectibles?  Share them and stay away from the wolfsbane!