Tag Archives: Ray Harryhausen

We’re Giving Away This Collector Pack from COMET TV

It’s a Harryhausen Hootenany with COMET TV!

If you’re anything like us, and we expect many of you are, you spend a lot of time scrolling through channels to find something awesome to watch.  Sure, everything is on-demand these days, but Netflix and Amazon Instant Video only have so much genre content for us fans to really dig into.  Enter CometTV with it’s incredible array of movies that you simply can’t get with a subscription to streaming platforms like Netflix, Amazon, or Hulu. From wild adventures on Mars to critically acclaimed classics to our beloved campy B-movies, COMET is the ultimate home of sci-fi and horror… and it’s all totally free, no subscriptions needed.

During the month of May, they’re paying special tribute to one of the master monster makers,  special effects pioneer Ray Harryhausen. Catch four of his classic films airing this month.

The 7th Voyage of Sinbad (1958)
Monday May 22 at 6P/5C

The Golden Voyage of Sinbad (1973)
Saturday May 27 at 10P/9C

The 3 Worlds of Gulliver (1960)
Friday May 26 at 10P/9C

Jason and The Argonauts (1963)
Tuesday May 23 at 6P/5C

Now, our friends at COMET TV have provided us with a swell  Collectors Set to give away to our of our awesome readers!

The Collector’s Set includes:

1 – Limited Edition custom designed T-Shirt: The God’s Want Their Entertainment! And So do Comet TV Fans! Show your love of classic Sci-Fi with this Limited Edition T-Shirt you can only get through this promotion!

10 – Skeleton Warrior Mini Figures: The perfect way to plan your own battle is with these skeleton warrior figures. Perfect addition to your classic monster collection!

2 – Packs of Candy Bones: After you vanquished your skeleton foes, celebrate with these sweet treats and read CollectingClassicMonsters.com

1 – Comet TV “Space Out” Fridge Magnet: This fridge is rated “S” for Spacey! Show your Comet TV love and love of Sci-Fi with this custom magnet. Only the cool kids have them!

1 – Comet TV “Space Out” Sticker: These are Spacey Times. Show your Comet TV love by sporting this awesome sticker. Ideal for the computer or tablet that you read CCM on!

How to Enter:

We’ve made it really easy to enter to win this cool collector set from our friends at COMET.  All you have to do is complete any of the following before by 12PM CST May 27, 2017.

To win, all you have to do is subscribe to our email list and any ONE of the following:

Subscribe to our Email List by entering your information in the Sign Up Box on this, or any page, on our website. After you’ve done that, simply do one of these:

  1. Like our Facebook Page
  2. Follow us on Twitter
  3. Comment on this website article and tell us about your favorite Harryhausen film and/or collectible.
  4. Already done all of the above? That’s cool! Just SHARE our Comet TV Facebook Post and tag our page:  @CollectingClassicMonsters

That’s it! Just subscribe to our email list and then do any one of these to be entered to win!  Good luck and happy watching!

Because…Lawyers:

Entries must be submitted by May 27, 2017 at 12pm CST. This contest is only open to residents of the United States. No international entries will be accepted. Winner(s) will be chosen randomly from valid entries and will be notified by email, so make certain you can receive email from CollectingClassicMonsters.com.   by May 30, 2017 and must respond within 48 hours to claim their prize. The prize will be sent via FedEx or USPS. No P.O. Boxes, please. Please allow 2-4 weeks for delivery of your prize pack. Only one entrant per household. If you have won the same prize on another blog, you will not be eligible to win it again. Winner is subject to eligibility verification.  Void where prohibited.

Any personal information you supply to Collecting Classic Monsters upon entering this contest will not be shared with any outside parties, except in the case when an outside party is handling prize fulfillment. In that instance, the prize winner(s) mailing information will be provided to the fulfillment team.

*Note, you can unsubscribe from the CCM newsletter at any time, but you need to be subscribed at the time the contest winner is selected. The monthly email contains links to all of our published stories from the previous month as well as exclusive content and special offers.

Disclosure: I received a free or greatly discounted product for the purpose of this review. The opinions are 100% mine. I have not been influenced in any way and I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will be good for my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with Federal Trade Commissions 16 CFR, Part 255 Guides Concerning the use of Endorsements and Testimonials In Advertising. Questions or concerns please contact me at george@collectingclassicmonsters.com

Related Articles:

(Video) Monsterama Episode 12 – Giant Ape Movie Collectibles

See Bob Burns’ King Kong & Might Joe Young Memorabilia

Bob Burns King Kong Collector

Anyone who has spent any time on this website knows that I am a passionate fan of King Kong.  From my formative days as a Monster Kid seeing the 1933 film for the first time, Kong has held a special place in my favorite monsters and favorite monster movies.  We’ve written numerous articles about collecting King Kong from Aurora Model Kits, toys and games and  to original film posters as well.

But no Kong collectible can beat the original armature used by Willis O’Brien in bringing the giant ape to life on screen, and Bob Burns is it’s caretaker.  Not only Kong’s armature, but Might Joe Young and a host of other original pieces from these fantastic films about giant apes.  Enjoy this video, Monster Kids, this might be as close as you ever get to some of these items!

Read more about King Kong Collectibles:

 

Classic Movie Posters – Valley of Gwangi

Classic Movie Poster Gallery

Valley of the Gwangi One Sheet

Valley of Gwangi (Warner Brothers, 1969)       27″ x 41″ U.S. One-Sheet

Poster art by renowned western artist Frank McCarthy who has an impressive movie poster resume that includes such minor works as The Ten Commandments, Thunderball and The Green Berets.

I highly recommend you click on the image above to enlarge it and spend some time looking at the incredible level of detail in McCarthy’s painting.  The juxtaposition of the larger-than-life Gwangi against the hordes of battling’ cowboys and fleeing civilians against the backdrop of a dinosaur boneyard is simply awesome.

Filmed in Technicolor with creature effects provided by Ray Harryhausen.  Valley of Gwangi was the last dinosaur-themed film to be animated by Harryhausen, who had inherited the project from his mentor Willis O’Brien.  O’Brien had planned to make The Valley of Gwangi decades earlier but died six years before the film was realized.

The story follows a similar trajectory as O’Brien’s King Kong with the giant beast being captured by greedy men who plan to make a fortune displaying him to the public, only to have the dinosaur break free from his cage and send the masses running for their lives from the rampaging beast.

The poster copy sums this movie up perfectly:

Cowboys Battle Monsters in the Lost World of Forbidden Valley.

Unbelievable!

Fantastic!

Amazing! 

Terrifying!

Synopsis

The discovery of a midget horse, thought to be of a species fifty million years old, prompts members of a Wild West show to venture into Mexico’s Forbidden Valley in search of world-wide fame and untold wealth. But they are met by prehistoric monsters, including “Gwangi,” a giant Allosaurus that decimates their ranks.

Here’s the film trailer for your viewing pleasure:

Poster Value

High-grade copies of this poster are usually priced between $400-$500 but better deals can be found.  The combination of Frank McCarthy‘s gorgeous art for a Ray Harryhausen dinosaur vs cowboys flick make this a poster that will continue to be desirable for collectors and genre fans for a long, long time.

Several current listings on eBay range in price from $150 to $500 with a Near Mint copy priced at $495.

Summary

Dinosaurs fighting cowboys. Lost Worlds inside Forbidden Valleys.  Brought to life in stunning Technicolor by the master Dynamation, Ray Harryhausen… It’s the stuff of Monster Kids’ dreams.  What can I say about this movie without sounding all gushy?  Nothing, so I might as well gush.  I simply love this movie, flaws and all.  And I love the movie poster almost as much as I love the film.  ‘Nuff said.

CLASSIC MOVIE POSTERS – Beast from 20,000 Fathoms

Classic Movie Poster Gallery

Beast from 20000 Fathoms One Sheet Movie PosterBeast from 20,000 Fathoms (Warner Brothers, 1953) 27″ x 41″ Style A One-Sheet

With Jurrasic World stomping through the box office,  I thought it would be fun to look back at classic movie posters of a film genre that is so near-and-dear to my heart, dinosaur movies.  Also, “lost worlds” and “giant atomic beasts.”  I love them all!

While not the first dinosaur/lost world film by a long shot, Beast from 20,000 Fathoms is the first in a long-line of movies in the “Giant Atomic Beast” genre, pre-dating even the venerable Godzilla by one year.  The importance of the film isn’t limited to simply being first.  This movie was also the first solo project for our beloved Ray Harryhausen and the only time in cinematic history that Harryhausen and his lifelong friend, Ray Bradbury, appeared in the film credits together.  The movie was loosely based on a short story Bradbury published in the Saturday Evening Post.

The one-sheet poster for this movie is simply great, including  no less than 5 tag lines:

The Seas’ Master Beast of the Ages – Raging Up From the Bottom of Time!

They Couldn’t Believe Their Eyes! They Couldn’t Escape the Terror! And Neither Will YOU! 

You’ll See It Tear a City Apart!

CASTS OF THOUSANDS! Over a Year in the Making!

Synopsis

A group of scientists and military men are in the remote far reaches of the Arctic Circle, testing a nuclear device. The detonation sets free a prehistoric “Rhedosaurus”, a giant carnivorous dinosaur that walks on four legs.  The Beast makes its way south toward old nesting grounds, sinking a ship along the way.  The Beast destroys a lighthouse along his route and eventually comes ashore in New York City, wreaking havoc. As if his ferocity and size were not enough of a menace, it is discovered that when wounded, the Beast drips blood that contains deadly amounts of radioactive bacteria. The military decides that the Beast will have to be taken out by a grenade rifle armed with a radioactive isotope leading to a final showdown in an unlikely setting – a closed amusement park.

Enjoy the movie trailer:

Poster Value:

This poster simply doesn’t show up at auction very often.  Heritage Auctions sold one way back in 2008 for $1,553.  There is one current eBay listing for a nice copy of the poster for $1,450.

Summary

This movie is simply great and it’s importance can’t be understated to fans of genre movies.  Not only did this film give Harryhausen is break-out opportunity, the film’s director, Eugene Lourie went on to become specialize in the genre of giant atomic beast invasion films.  In 1959 he directed The Giant Behemoth, which featured stop-motion effects by Willis O’Brien and his assistant Pete Peterson, using many of the same low-budget methods that Harryhausen had pioneered. This was followed in short order by Gorgo (1961), which Lourie directed in England, this time featuring a man-in-a-suit monster.

The commercial success of Beast from 20,000 Fathoms led other Hollywood studios to jump on the bandwagon.  The following is from Turner Classic Movies tribute to Ray Harryhausen:

Meanwhile, the influence of Harryhausen’s first solo creation was being felt around the world. In Japan, producer Tomoyuki Tanaka of Toho Studios read a synopsis of The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms in a trade magazine, and it inspired him to create a homegrown monster-on-the-loose. The first script for what would become Gojira (1954) even included an attack on a lighthouse. Gojira was a fearsome scaly-spined dinosaur brought to life as a man-in-a-suit by effects expert and longtime Kong fan Eiji Tsuburaya. (The edited film received added footage featuring Raymond Burr and a new title for its American release as Godzilla, King of the Monsters in 1956).

Warner Bros. also took note of the success of Beast and immediately put into production Them! (1954), which would feature an invasion of giant ants and a copycat release pattern of saturation bookings and a massive advertising campaign. Other studios would launch their own giant insect films as a result. So two entire movie sub-genres, the Japanese daikaiju (giant monster) film, and the American “Big Bug” movie, can be traced back to the twin successes of the 1952 reissue of King Kong and its Atomic-Age imitator, The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms.

And on top of all that, the movie poster is simply awesome,